All Snarled Up

Posted in response to the Daily Post weekly photo challenge. This week’s theme ‘Dense’.

The overhead wiring in Delhi is as dense and impenetrable as the traffic in the street below!

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I could’ve been a star…

Posted in response to the Daily Post weekly photo challenge. This week’s them ‘The Road Taken’

To this day I don’t know why Dad was so furious when I told him I was learning to play the tambourine.  Well, I know it wasn’t particularly the tambourine side of things he didn’t like, I mean, who doesn’t like a tambourine, it was more where, and by whom, I was learning to play.

To be fair, most people don’t need lessons.  I understand that.

In a way it was his fault.  He was a collector of tat, and one day bought home a red tambourine, complete with long red, blue and yellow ribbons attached.  They swished as I banged and rattled. It was a joyful thing.

I don’t think my parents thought of it as joyful for long though. I’d march about our huge ‘over a shop’ flat, singing along to the tuneless bang rattle. 

I knew about marching.  We lived on a main road, so main that there was a bus stop right outside our front door, I used to have to navigate queues of people to cross over the road to the sweet shop to by my weekly jamboree bag.  I used to love jamboree bags, the blackjacks and the mojos, and the surprise cigarette card, sometimes a sugary lollipop, it’s a wonder any child of the 50’s has any teeth left at all.

Anyhow, pretty much every other Sunday morning a parade would pass by our flat and the sweetshop and the garage and the pub over the road.  I never really knew where they marched from or to, or why, but the people were all ages, dressed in uniforms, marching smartly while being led along, by a pied piper of a brass band.  Some of them were scouts, some girl guides, but the band were special, smart black uniforms, shiny instruments, and… tambourines, four or five playing in unison.  Women with their arms waving, making shapes with the ribbons… across, down, up, across, down up, across, down, up…

This was the Salvation Army band in all it’s glory.  We could hear them coming for a good five minutes before they passed our door.  My sister and I would watch them from the eyrie of our second floor bedroom window, still listening even after they’d disappeared from view.  Oh how I wanted to march like that, all smart, and in a troupe, all in time… left, right, left, right…

As it happens, the Salvation Army headquarters was next door to our house.  It was a dingy long low building stretching back off the road, separated from our backgarden by a fairly rickety six foot brick wall.  I couldn’t see through the grilled windows, but occasionally heard singing coming from inside, other than that it was an off-limits mystery. 

Nevertheless, I snuck in one day when the big red doors were open.  I don’t really remember what got into me.  I must’ve been about nine.  The people there were lovely and welcoming. I told them I lived next door and that I’d got a tambourine, and that’s when they told me I could learn to ‘play it properly’.   So I had lessons. Two of them. Before my dad found out.

Goodness, he was spitting nails when he heard.  What he didn’t call those poor people, who had after all, treated me very kindly. He was thoroughly ag’in religion in any shape or form, and the Sally Army was, in his mind at least, one of the most heinous sects imaginable. I was forbidden to go anywhere near them again.  I’m quite sure I was punished too, but my main memory is my anger and disbelief at the injustice of it all.  He never did explain his reasoning to me.  Dad never needed a reason for anything.  He was his own man.  So without further ado my road to tambourine greatness ended.

I still remember the ‘Cricket stump’ move though (across, down, up etc..) and can play a tambourine with the best of ‘em. And every time I see a Salvation Army band playing carols at Christmas time (actually, the only time I ever see them these days) I remember the grim dark hall and the silk ribbons of my shiny tambourine.

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Not the Salvation Army! This was taken at Easter in Sorrento some years back 🙂

 

 

 

 

Where the heart is

Posted in response to the Daily Post weekly photo challenge. This week’s theme ‘Solitude’

home

Oh I do enjoy a bit of me time now and again.  In front of the fire, with a nice cuppa tea in my favourite cheery uppy mug, slippers on, feet on the table (oh I know, what a rebel), remote, ipad and phone all within reaching distance. What could be nicer?

It’s a late morning

Posted in response to the Daily Post weekly photo challenge – last week’s theme ‘Morning’.

Morning

Like the white rabbit ‘I’m late, I’m late…’ this was actually last week’s prompt. Oh well, never been one to conform!

Oh and another thing…

It wasn’t taken in the morning.

Sorry.

What can I say… I feel naughty!

It was taken from my position in our hammock whilst waiting for my sausages to cook/cremate.  The ‘morning mist’ filtering through the trees, is actually smoke from the barbeque, but I thought it looked the part.  Oh..

and I added the daisies in for effect…

Otherwise all genuine and my representation of what a morning should be.

Hope all your mornings are sunny and bright x

🙂

 

 

An age apart

Posted in response to this weeks Daily Post weekly photo challenge. This week’s theme ‘Opposites’. https://dailypost.wordpress.com/photo-challenges/opposites/  (eek…url linky thing not working!)

I have to pinch my arm to remind myself that just a few weeks ago I was in Japan.  For as long as I can remember, it’s a country and culture that has fascinated me and drawn me to it.  It’s been top of my bucket list for, like, e-ver, and now it’s been crossed off as ‘done’!

And I have to tell you, it didn’t disappoint.

We did a small group tour, and in just two short weeks managed to feel immersed in it’s fabulous diversity – from the madness of Tokyo and Osaka, to the tranquillity of Takayama and Kamikochi. In fact, when I saw that this weeks photo challenge theme was ‘opposites’ Japan instantly sprang to mind, and I was sure I could find a suitable photograph among the, well alright, over a thousand, that I took (excessive I know, but well, it’s so darn photogenic!).   I chose this one, taken in Hama-rikyu Gardens, Tokyo, which illustrates how, despite the towering new glass buildings that Tokyo is known for, the old gardens at their heart remain quiet and peaceful, and in fact, I think, their beauty is enhanced by that sparkling backdrop.

This picture also made me think of the office workers peering out over their computer screens through the window, and down at the gardener working away in the sunshine.  Opposites indeed.

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Under an alien sky

Posted in response to the Daily Post weekly photo challenge. This week’s theme ‘Abstract’

Cheated a bit this week and used the theme as an excuse to play with image editing.  I use and editing suite called ‘Gimp’ which is the open-source version of Photoshop.  It may not have quite all the bells and whistles that photoshop has, but it’s pretty close and being the free option, I’m happy to work with it!

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Here is the original for comparison.  It was taken on our wonderful holiday in Beadnell, Northumberland, a couple of years ago.

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